Author Topic: Excessive Heat - how it kills and how to prevent heat stroke  (Read 1203 times)

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By: Dr. Daliah, The Dr. Daliah Show 


The National Weather Service has issued an "excessive heat warning" for many parts of the country. This occurs  "within 12 hours of the onset of extremely dangerous heat conditions".  This means that the heat index (air temperature and humidity) will be greater than 105 degrees for more than three hours a day for at least two days in a row and the night time temperatures will not drop below 75 degrees.  Although many of us may live in areas where this occurs each year, the onset can be one of the most dangerous times.

At first when one feels symptoms, it may come in the form of heat cramps.  Heat cramps are painful spasms that occur in the muscles of the arms and legs and even abdomen.  We believe that when one loses fluids and salts from excessive sweating, cramps ensue.  Its important in these cases to get the person out of the heat, hydrate them with sips of fluid and electrolytes and massage the body parts affected.

If one does not leave the heat and come indoors, the next risky event that can occur is heat exhaustion.  This worsens as the victim sweats profusely becoming more and more dehydrated. They could also have cramps but nausea may ensue, they may look pale and clammy and their heart rate will increase to try to compensate for the lost fluid. These individuals may become dizzy, weak and even faint.  Immediately bring the person indoors, give sips of fluid, cool down the body applying cool and wet cloths to the underarms and body, and contact medical authorities if symptoms continue or worsen.

Heat stroke will occur if a vulnerable person does not get out of the heat in time.  It is a medical emergency and can be fatal.  If an individual has heat stroke 9-1-1 must be called immediately. Bring the victim indoors away from sunlight, lie them down, remove unnecessary clothing, cool their body with cold compresses and watch for signs of rapidly progressive heat stroke in which they have difficulty breathing, seize or lose consciousness.  If they are unconscious you cannot give them fluids.  Only if they are alert, awake and able to swallow will you be able to give fluids. Do not give medications to reduce the fever such as aspirin or acetaminophen since their body may not be able to metabolize them properly and this could make matters worse.

Who is vulnerable?  Young children and elderly individuals may have issues adjusting to the outside environment and may be more prone to dehydration.  Those with medical conditions such as heart, lung, thyroid disease can be at risk as well.  If you've ever suffered from heat stroke you can be vulnerable again. And many medications could make you susceptible such as diuretics, vasodilators  and beta-blockers for blood pressure and antidepressants.

The biggest risk comes when we are unprepared.  Having an unusual cool week prior to a heat warning could preclude many from taking proper precautions.  Staying indoors, checking air conditioning and fan devices to make sure they work properly, wearing cooler clothing is just the beginning.  Stocking up and planning to hydrate frequently is paramount because when death occurs to excessive heat, dehydration is the main culprit.

Bring your pets indoors, and watch your kids, friends and family members frequently.  If they are beginning to succumb to the heat, they may be quiet and not be able to voice it.

Avoid drinking alcohol in the heat.  It can dehydrate you more and worsen the situation. 

Avoid excessive exercise when outdoors and make sure to make use of shady areas.

The start of summer could be exciting, fun and an opportunity to enjoy nature.  Don't let the heat get to you. Remember....if you can't take the heat, get out of the.....well heat.......



 

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