Author Topic: Kriss Ann Hall Explains What's Going on in Oregon  (Read 3155 times)

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Kriss Ann Hall Explains What's Going on in Oregon
« on: January 06, 2016, 07:52:03 AM »



natesmess

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Re: Kriss Ann Hall Explains What's Going on in Oregon
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2016, 04:14:47 PM »
Excellent!  :)

thereader

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Re: Kriss Ann Hall Explains What's Going on in Oregon
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2016, 04:08:40 PM »
You have touch a subject very near and dear to me and you are acting on bad info. I would invite you to re-read McCulloch v. Maryland, Texas v. White and the dissent of U.S. v. Reese, the word "state" is very liquid in and most certainly after the constitution. With regard to what land the U.S. "owns or holds in trust" read the Enabling Acts for Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and others. My personal favorite is a line from Minor v. Heppersett and reads "the United States has no voters in the states of it's own creation."

a_frickin_american

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Re: Kriss Ann Hall Explains What's Going on in Oregon
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2016, 08:41:59 PM »

thereader: Wish you could've elaborated a bit. What is the bad info? What does the Minor v. Heppersett quote mean within its context? And, are you saying the Supreme Court opinion trumps the Constitution?

This whole thing gets really complicated really quick when you allow the Federal City to “own” and have jurisdiction within a State.

Quote
The relationship between States and persons residing in Federal areas in those States is disarranged and disrupted, with tax losses, lack of police control, and other disadvantages to the States. Many residents of federally owned areas are deprived of numerous privileges and services, such as voting, and certain access to courts, which are the usual incidents of residence within a State. In short, it was found by the Department of Justice that this whole important field of Federal-State relations was in a confused and chaotic state, and that more was needed a thorough study of the entire subject of legislative jurisdiction with a view toward resolving as many as possible of the problems which lack of full knowledge and understanding of the subject had bred.

Constitution.org: Jurisduction over federal areas within the States

My specific objection to what I heard her saying on The Power Hour this Monday 2/8 (about 17:20) is, she claimed the fedgov has no authority to contract with States. But the Constitution plainly provides that they can purchase land and within those purchased areas they may exercise exclusive jurisdiction.
This is not an “equal footing” question; it’s a federal purchase and State cession issue. All the States have voluntarily and constitutionally ceded some authority. The question is, how do they get it back?

 

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