Author Topic: Love ya Mike, but you're no nuclear engineer  (Read 2877 times)

Joe_Patriot

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Love ya Mike, but you're no nuclear engineer
« on: May 20, 2015, 05:26:58 PM »
This message is in response to a statement made by Mike Rivero during the 3rd hour of his show 5-20-15

Mike, control rod design was changed from top-down to bottom-up so that in a meltdown situation, the core would melt down over the rods, causing it to quench.  When a core goes critical, it happens so fast that before the control rods can be dropped into the core, it's too late, and you know what happens after that.  ;D




Michael Rivero

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Re: Love ya Mike, but you're no nuclear engineer
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2015, 02:56:59 PM »
That is absurd. It takes far longer (and greater temperatures) to melt the core down over the control rods than to slam the control rods home, and in the GE design, the core has to melt through the reactor housing to get to the removed control rods.


This message is in response to a statement made by Mike Rivero during the 3rd hour of his show 5-20-15

Mike, control rod design was changed from top-down to bottom-up so that in a meltdown situation, the core would melt down over the rods, causing it to quench.  When a core goes critical, it happens so fast that before the control rods can be dropped into the core, it's too late, and you know what happens after that.  ;D

Twisted_Leads

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Re: Love ya Mike, but you're no nuclear engineer
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2015, 04:46:24 PM »
Control Rods absorb thermal neutrons when inserted into the core (through spaces specifically built into the fuel assemblies). GE BWRs insert the control "blades" upwardly from the bottom of the reactor. This requires hydraulic actuators known as Control Rod Drives. PWRs use gravity to rapidly insert the control rods (when released) from above.

At Fukushima, the control blades inserted, killing the fission reaction. Unfortunately, decay heat removal failed and resulted in the devastation we are now left with. 

 

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